Climb in the way-back machine to write YA fiction

For YA fiction, here’s an approach I am taking to heart. My choices of words, the structure of sentences and even paragraphs need to reflect the age and level of maturity of the main character(s). As the characters change and grow, the complexity of the sentences can grow. But their youth limits their world view. So I’ve been working on using sentences that are declarative. Short. The rhythm of the language reflects the characters’ thought processes. Thoughts seldom–okay never–move in a straight line. Emotions can be explosive, or flighty, or hesitant, depending on the character’s temperament at the time. Pacing changes with the characters’ activity and the pressures they confront.

YA fiction = life by immersion

“…YA books present the teenage perspective in a fundamentally uncritical way. It’s not simply that YA readers are asked to immerse themselves in a character’s emotional life—that’s the trick of so much great fiction—but that they are asked to abandon the mature insights into that perspective that they (supposedly) have acquired as adults.”
Source:
“No, you do not have to be ashamed of reading young adult fiction:” The Washington Post: By Alyssa Rosenberg June 6, 2014

How do kids benefit from reading historical fiction? Answer 3

“Authors of historical fiction provide young readers with the human side of history, making it more real and more memorable.”

(Lynch-Brown, Essentials of Children’s Literature, 2008)
Source: Oklahoma State University Library: Historical Fiction for Young People: Home: Why Read Historical Fiction: Three Opinions

How do kids benefit from reading historical fiction? Answer 2

“Every book set in the past invites a comparison with the present. Opportunities for critical thinking and judgment are built into the many novels that provide conflicting views on an issue and force characters to make hard choices… Historical perspective also helps children see and judge the mistakes of the past.” (Charlotte Huck’s Children’s Literature, 2009)

Source: Oklahoma State University Library: Historical Fiction for Young People: Home: Why Read Historical Fiction: Three Opinions

How do kids benefit from reading historical fiction? Answer 1

“Reading historical novels satisfies our curiosity about other times, places, and people… it provides adventure, suspense, and mystery… and to teach particular lessons. (Nilson et al. Literature for Today’s Young Adults, 2013)

Source: Oklahoma State University Library: Historical Fiction for Young People: Home: Why Read Historical Fiction: Three Opinions

What qualifies as historical fiction? Answer 1

It’s a matter of perspective, some think.

“Teen readers often consider anything that happened before they were born to be ancient history. Teen readers I asked considered stories set in the 1980s and prior to be historical fiction.” (D.T. Herald, Teen Genreflecting 3, 2011)
Source: Oklahoma State University Library: Historical Fiction for Young People: Home

Answering the Challenge of Plotting for Young Adult (YA)

How much conflict? How intense should the conflict be? Should the conflict only come from elements or situations the young adult character encounters in the external world? What about the world on which the still-dependent character depends? Can that generate a challenge, too?
I found an interesting site with thoughtful information on plotting a young adult novel. This was helpful:

Writers Edit: How To Master Conflict In Young Adult Fiction
http://www.writersedit.com/how-to-master-conflict-in-young-adult-fiction/